Smashing career stereotypes

We want to break down barriers to opportunities for young women, so they can smash career stereotypes and be anything they want to be.

Apprenticeships

All too often apprenticeships are not working for young women.

Young women are more likely than young men to do apprenticeships in a small number of low paid sectors, like child care or social care.

1 woman starts an apprenticeship in engineering for every 20 men, while 13 times as many women started an apprenticeship in childcare. An engineering apprentice earns on average £3000 a year more than a childcare apprentice.

Women continue to earn less for years after they complete their apprenticeship.

We want to see a flexible apprenticeship system that offers young women the best opportunities to be anything they want to be.

Read our research on apprenticeships

Woman coding at a computer

Women in STEM

Meet Nia and Caroline, who tell us why they love working in STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) and share advice for other young women who want to enter the field.

Read more
The camera is on the floor looking upwards. ABove a young woman stands, with her foot poised in the air about to stamp on the camera.

One Size Fits No One

Our report One Size Fits No One found that,

  • In 2020, women aged 18 to 21 earned 31% less than young men of the same age and 19% less in the 22 to 29 age group
  • Male graduates in architecture and computer science earn £4,500 more a year than women with the same qualifications
  • 30% of young women who identified their ethnicity as Black or mixed heritage had been discriminated against because of their ethnicity when looking for work

Read the report

Explore the issues

Young women working together at a table

Building equal workplaces

Young women face discrimination at work every day. A third of young women have faced discrimination when looking for work or while working.