Young Women's Trust's response to Fawcett Society report

Friday 20 January 2017

YWTCommenting on the Fawcett Society’s report on gender equality, ‘Sounds Familiar’, which will be published on Friday 20 January 2017, Young Women’s Trust chief executive Dr Carole Easton OBE said:

“Young Women’s Trust research shows that more than half of young women fear for the future and it is easy to see why.

“From the moment they start work, young women are paid less than men and they don’t see much chance of that changing any time soon. A quarter of young people surveyed by Young Women’s Trust said that it would take more than 25 years for women’s average earnings to be as high as men’s, or that it would never be achieved. 72% of young women said that women still face discrimination in the workplace, with just 21 per cent believing this would be a thing of the past by the time they were 40.

“Progress for young women is proving too slow. We need action now to close the gender pay gap and improve women’s prospects, or they face a lifetime of inequality.”

ENDS

Notes to editor:

  • Young Women’s Trust supports and represents women aged 16-30 trapped by low or no pay and facing a life of poverty. The charity provides services and runs campaigns to make sure that the talents of young women don't go to waste.
  • Young Women’s Trust commissioned Populus Data Solutions to undertake a survey of young people between 27 June and 13 July 2016. A representative sample of 4,014 18-30 year olds in Great Britain, from the Populus Live Online Panel, were surveyed. Young Women’s Trust’s survey found that:

-       more than half of young people said they feel worried for the future (55 per cent of young women, 47 per cent of young men);

-       39 per cent of young women said it was a struggle to make their cash last to the end of the month and 27 per cent of young women said they are in debt all of the time;

-       a quarter of 18-30 year olds had to move back home with their parents because they couldn't afford to live independently;

-       one in four 18-30 year old women have been paid less than the minimum wage;

-       26 per cent of young people said that it would take more than 25 years for women’s average earnings to be as high as men’s, or that it would never be achieved;

-       almost a quarter of young people (23%) said it would take at least 25 years for there to be equal numbers of women business leaders as men, while an additional 12% said it will never be achieved;

-       63 per cent of young people agreed that women still face discrimination in the workplace. Young women (72%) are much more likely to think this than young men (54%).

-       Just 28% of young people said it is likely that gender discrimination in the UK will be a thing of the past by the time they are 40 (21% of young women, 36% of young men). Less than half believe it is likely that men and women will be treated equally in the workplace (37% of young women, 59% of young men).

  • The report based on Young Women’s Trust’s annual survey, No Country For Young Women, can be found here

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